Click here to download a free Brochure for the Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is one of the six Faculties that are currently functional in the university. It was established in 1998 with the aim of producing qualified teachers and educationists who contribute to the postwar recovery of Somaliland educational system.

The Faculty started with three lecturers and ten students, and has grown tremendously since then. Now it is the largest Faculty of the University and hosts over 60 lecturers and 800 students.

Currently, the Faculty includes five departments, namely department of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Social Studies and Department of Languages.
By providing students with up-to date skills, knowledge and attitude, we prepare students to be competent in a challenging, constantly changing, multicultural work environment. In order to achieve its mission, the Faculty will expand its programs and adopt a variety of modes of delivery.

Amoud University President Prof. Suleiman A. Gulaid and Dean Faculty of Education Abdirahman Ahmed

 

Vision

Amoud University Faculty of Education aspires to be an international renowned center of excellence in teaching and education and to produce knowledgeable, reflective life-long learners who care about the welfare of others and the environment, and who are recognized for their leadership and commitment to the very best in teaching and learning


Mission

The Faculty is committed to the advancement of knowledge through reflective teaching, leading-edge pedagogy, innovative curriculum, modern ICT, engagement with learners, environmental awareness and resource optimization. Through its different programs, the Faculty is committed to promote the culture of peace, dialogue, democracy and indigenous knowledge.

Objectives

  • To produce well-qualified teachers in the fields of natural and social sciences.
  • To provide in-service training opportunities to staff in educational institutions, Ministry of Education and related fields for the purpose of upgrading and updating their knowledge and competence.
  • To sustain an outstanding academic staff dedicated to undergraduate and postgraduate excellence in teaching, learning and research.
  • To improve education theory and practice and contribute to the development of the nation by producing quality research and publications in the field of education.
  • To provide innovate and diverse academic programs that respond to the needs of the changing world.
  • To produce high quality teachers educationists and who are equipped with advanced knowledge in their fields of specialization, up-to date professional knowledge and modern ICT skills.
  • To strengthen the education profession through active engagement in significant initiatives, enterprises and activities, and through discussions, debates and the provision of expert knowledge.

 

Office of The Associate Dean, Faculty of Education, Main Campus, May 2015

 

Our Partners

The Faculty of Education works with such development partners as Governmental and Non Governmental Organizations, other sister insitutions such as those in the links shown here below

  1. http://www.cfbt.com/en-GB/Where-we-do-it/Sub-Saharan-Africa/Somalia
  2. http://www.avu.org/Academic-Partner-Institutions/active-academic-partners.html

 

Office of Co-ordinator for SCOTTPS and STEPS Programmes AU, Main Campus, May 2015

 

 

Click here to download a free Brochure for the Faculty of Education

The Faculty of Education is one of the six Faculties that are currently functional in the university. It was established in 1998 with the aim of producing qualified teachers and educationists who contribute to the postwar recovery of Somaliland educational system.

The Faculty started with three lecturers and ten students, and has grown tremendously since then. Now it is the largest Faculty of the University and hosts over 60 lecturers and 800 students.

Currently, the Faculty includes five departments, namely department of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Social Studies and Department of Languages.
By providing students with up-to date skills, knowledge and attitude, we prepare students to be competent in a challenging, constantly changing, multicultural work environment. In order to achieve its mission, the Faculty will expand its programs and adopt a variety of modes of delivery.

Amoud University President Prof. Suleiman A. Gulaid and Dean Faculty of Education Abdirahman Ahmed

 

Vision

Amoud University Faculty of Education aspires to be an international renowned center of excellence in teaching and education and to produce knowledgeable, reflective life-long learners who care about the welfare of others and the environment, and who are recognized for their leadership and commitment to the very best in teaching and learning


Mission

The Faculty is committed to the advancement of knowledge through reflective teaching, leading-edge pedagogy, innovative curriculum, modern ICT, engagement with learners, environmental awareness and resource optimization. Through its different programs, the Faculty is committed to promote the culture of peace, dialogue, democracy and indigenous knowledge.

Objectives

  • To produce well-qualified teachers in the fields of natural and social sciences.
  • To provide in-service training opportunities to staff in educational institutions, Ministry of Education and related fields for the purpose of upgrading and updating their knowledge and competence.
  • To sustain an outstanding academic staff dedicated to undergraduate and postgraduate excellence in teaching, learning and research.
  • To improve education theory and practice and contribute to the development of the nation by producing quality research and publications in the field of education.
  • To provide innovate and diverse academic programs that respond to the needs of the changing world.
  • To produce high quality teachers educationists and who are equipped with advanced knowledge in their fields of specialization, up-to date professional knowledge and modern ICT skills.
  • To strengthen the education profession through active engagement in significant initiatives, enterprises and activities, and through discussions, debates and the provision of expert knowledge.

 

Office of The Associate Dean, Faculty of Education, Main Campus, May 2015

 

Our Partners

The Faculty of Education works with such development partners as Governmental and Non Governmental Organizations, other sister insitutions such as those in the links shown here below

  1. http://www.cfbt.com/en-GB/Where-we-do-it/Sub-Saharan-Africa/Somalia
  2. http://www.avu.org/Academic-Partner-Institutions/active-academic-partners.html

 

Office of Co-ordinator for SCOTTPS and STEPS Programmes AU, Main Campus, May 2015

 

 

List of Programmes Offered at The Faculty

 

Programmes Offered at The faculty

  1. Bachelor of Science in Education (Biology)
  2. Bachelor of Science in Education (Chemistry)
  3. Bachelor of Science in Education (Mathematics)
  4. Bachelor of Science in Education (Physics)
  5. Bachelor of Arts in Education (Geography)
  6. Bachelor of Arts in Education (English)
  7. Bachelor of Arts in Education (History)
  8. Diploma in Education (Biology/Chemistry Majors)
  9. Diploma in Education (Geography/History Majors)
  10. Diploma in Education (Physics/Math Majors)
  11. Diploma in Education (Agriculture/ Biology Majors)
  12. Diploma in Education (Business/Math Majors)

 

 

1. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (BIOLOGY)

Introduction

The Biology Department at Amoud Faculty of Education offers both degree and diploma programs in Biology. Students pursuing degree at the Faculty can take Biology either as a major or as a minor. The Department also offers basic courses to other Faculties of the University.

Philosophy

The Department is based on the assumption that Biology as a discipline offers practical, real-life solution to many problems in the community. In addition, Biology is especially important at a time of drastic environmental and climate change. Therefore, the Department intends to serve the needs of the society by providing the knowledge and education necessary for developing biological education and agricultural science training. In addition, the Department would help the community comprehend and explore the nature and behaviour of living organisms – including us – and their relationship with the environment.

Students

The Department plans to produce responsible, professional students who are capable of delivering their knowledge and experience to their clients effectively and successfully.

Goals

The goals of the Biology Department include:
•    To prepare the future biology teacher in order to fulfil the national educational demands in secondary schools.
•    To prepare the graduates to pursue further studies in higher education.
•    To enable students to understand how life and living things are inter-related and how they interact with the environment.
•    To develop students’ critical thinking and problem solving abilities.

 

Course Requirements for Biology Major

Total number of courses required = 17       Total number of credit hours = 52

 

 

S/No

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

1  BIO 121  Cell Biology  3
2  BIO 211  Zoology I  3
3  BIO 212  Botany I  3
4  BIO 221  Zoology II  3
5  BIO 222  Botany II  3
6  BIO 311  Human Anatomy & Physiology I  3
7  BIO 321  Human Anatomy & Physiology II  3
8  BIO 312  Tropical Crops Production  3
9  BIO 313  Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy  3
10  BIO 322  Microbiology  3
11  BIO 323  General Ecology  3
12  BIO 413  Plant Anatomy and physiology  3
13  BIO 412  Genetics  3
14  BIO 411  Biochemistry  3
15  BIO 422  Vertebrate Embryology  3
16  BIO 421  Community Health  3
17  BIO 414  Senior Project  3
TOTAL     52

 

 

Course Requirements for Chemistry Minor

Total Number of Courses = 8        Total Number of Credit Hours = 24

S/No

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

 1 CHEM 211 Chemistry I   3
 2 CHEM 212  Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory  3
 3 CHEM 2221  Chemistry II  3
 4 CHEM 222  Organic Chem. I  3
 5  CHEM 311  Organic Chem. II  3
 6  CHEM 321  Physical Chemistry I  3
 7  CHEM 223  Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry  3
 8  CHEM 312  Analytical Chemistry I  3
   TOTAL  24

 

 

Course Requirements for Agriculture Minors

Total Number of Agriculture Courses: 8     Total Number of Credit Hours: 24

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credit

 1  AGRI 211  Intro. To Agric. Education  3
 2  AGRI 221  Principles of Crop Production  3
 3  AGRI 212  Soil Science  3
 4  AGRI 222  Horticulture I  3
 5  AGRI 321  Farm Equipment and Building  3
 6  AGRI 311  Animal Health and Hygiene  3
 7  AGRI 411  Farm Management  3
 8  AGRI 322  Poultry Production 3
   TOTAL  24

 

 Bachelor of Science in Education (Biology Major/ Chemistry Minor)
 YEAR SEMESTER COURSE CODE COURSE TITLE  L      
 P      
CH     
CU    
   I  ENG 111  Language Structure I  45  0  45  2
     ENG 112  Reading and Vocabulary I  45  0  45  2
     ENG 113  Writing Skills I  45  0  45  2
     ISL 111  Islamic Studies  45  0  45  3
     SOL 111  Sociology  45  0  45  3
     GEO 111  World Regional Georagphy  45  0  45  3
     MAT 111  Pre-Calculus  45  0  45  3
           TOTAL CU 18
   II  ENG 121 Language Structure II  45 0  45 3
     ENG 122  Reading and Vocabulary II  45  0  45  3
     ENG 123  Writing Skills II  45  0  45  3
     ARA 121  Freshman Arabic  45  0  45  3
     PSY 121  Psychology  45  0  45  3
     BIO 121  General Biology  45  0  45  3
     MAT 121  Calculus I  45  0 45  3
           TOTAL CU  21
 Sophomore  I BIO 211 Zoology  45 0  45 3
     BIO 212  Botany  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 211  Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 212  Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory  30 30  60  3
     CSC 211  Introduction to Computers  30 30  60  3
     EDU 121  Introduction to Psychology  45 0  45  3
     ENG 211  Reading Skills  45  0 45  3
           TOTAL CU  21
  II BIO 221 Zoology II  45  0 45  3
     BIO 222  Botany II  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 221  Chemistry II  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 222  Organic Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
     ENG 221  Writing Skills  45  0  45  3
     EDU 221  Educatucational Statistics  45  0  45  3
     EDU 211  Human Development  45 0  45  3
           TOTAL CU 21
 Junior  I BIO 311  Human Anatomy and Physiology  45 0  45 3
     BIO 312  Tropical Crops and Pests  45  0  45  3
     BIO 313  Vert. Comp. Anatomy  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 311  Organic Chemistry  45  0  45  3
     SOM 311  Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
     EDU 222  Education Psychology  45  0  45  3
     BIO 314 Practical Biology  45  0 45  3
        TOTAL CU    21
   II BIO 321 Human Anatomy and Physiology II  45 0  45 3
     BIO 322  Microbiology  45  0  45  3
     BIO 323  General Ecology  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 233  Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 321  Physical Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
     EDU 321  Research Methods 45  0 45  3
         TOTAL CU   18
 Senior I BIO 412 Genetics  45 0 45 3
     BIO 413  Plant Anantomy and Physiology  45  0  45  3
     BIO 414  Senior Project  45  0  45  3
     EDU 322  Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45  0  45  3
     EDU 331  Measurement and Evaluation in Education  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 312  Analytical Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
           TOTAL CU 18
   II  BIO 421 Community Health 45 0 45 3
     BIO 422  Vert. Embryology  45  0  45  3
     EDU 421  Educational Management and Admin.  45  0  45  3
     EDU 411  Curriculum Studies  45  0  45  3
     BIO 411  Biochemistry  45  0  45  3
           TOTAL CU  12

 

 

 

2. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (CHEMISTRY)

Introduction

The Chemistry Department offers a variety of courses that lead to a major or minor in Chemistry for Degree students. Students who are pursuing Diploma in Education can take Chemistry as one of their double majors. The Department also offers chemistry courses to other Faculties and Departments of the University.

Philosophy

The Chemistry Department exists to produce teachers who will:

  • Be academically and professionally qualified and able to teach effectively in Chemistry and Mathematics/Biology (major and minor respectively) offered in the Secondary Schools.
  • Promote students’ interest in learning and enable them to work independently and co-operatively so that they can acquire knowledge, skills of planning, analysis, organization, research and evaluation,
  • Be able to effectively use learner-centred, practical-oriented, student-friendly methodology (with due gender consideration) in delivering the subject matter.
  • Instil courage and confidence in students.

Students

The students who successfully complete the programs of the Department are expected to have the following characteristics:

  • Have sufficient academic qualifications and knowledge to teach Chemistry and their minor subject (Mathematics or Biology).
  • Plan, implement and evaluate lessons in their major and minor subjects.
  • Use appropriate methods, including active learning and cooperative learning techniques.
  • Conduct independent practical activities in chemistry teaching at the secondary schools with confidence, sufficient ability and skills.
  • Have strategies for ensuring effective learning in large and mixed-age   classes.
  • Prepare, select and use appropriate teaching/learning materials.
  • Understand and utilize the recent advances in science and technology for the benefits of students and the society.
  • Have sufficient knowledge and skills in assessment methods to measure students’ educational needs and progress, including those students with special learning needs.

Goals

The following are the goals of the Department:  

  • To train secondary school teachers who can teach the subject in the most effective and efficient manner.
  • To improve the quality of teaching Chemistry secondary schools in Somaliland.
  • To influence the society’s understanding of Chemistry and its application in real life situations.

 

 

Course Requirements for Chemistry Major with mathematics minor

Total number of courses required = 16       Total number of credit hours  = 49

 

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

1 CHEM 100 General Chemistry I 3
2 CHEM 211 Chemistry I 3
3 CHEM 212 Intro. To Chemistry Laboratory 3
4 CHEM 221 Chemistry II 3
5 CHEM 222 Organic Chemistry I 3
6 CHEM 311 Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry 3
7 CHEM 312 Organic Chemistry II 3
8 CHEM 313 Physical Chemistry I 3
9 CHEM 323 Analytical Chemistry 3
10 CHEM 322 Physical Chemistry II 3
11 CHEM 422 Biochemistry 3
12 CHEM 411 Senior project 3
13 CHEM 412 Environmental chemistry 3
14 CHEM 413 Qualitative organic Chemistry 3
15 CHEM 421 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 4
16 CHEM 423 Integration of ICT into Chemistry (Elective) 3
TOTAL 49

 

Course Requirements for Mathematics Minor

Total number of courses required = 9         Total number of credit hours = 27

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

1 MATH 111 Pre-calculus 3
2 MATH 121 Calculus I 3
3 MATH 211 Calculus II 3
4 MATH 221 Calculus III 3
5 MATH 213 Probability and Statistics 3
6 MATH 311 Differential Equation I 3
7 MATH 222 Geometry I 3
8 MATH 224 Linear Algebra 3
9 MATH Abstract Algebra 3
TOTAL 27

 

 

Bachelor of Science (Chemistry Major/ Math Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses

YEAR

SEMESTER

COURSE CODE

COURSE TITLE

L     

P     

CH   

CU   

Freshman I ENG 111 Language Structure I 45 0 45 2
    ENG 112 Reading and Vocabulary I 45 0 45 2
    ENG 113 Writing Skills I 45 0 45 2
    ISL 111 Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111 Sociology 45 0 45 3
    GEO 111 World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
    MAT 111 Precalculus 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
  II ENG 121 Language and Structure II 45 0 45 2
    ENG 122 Reading and Vocabulary II 45 0 45 2
    ENG 123 Writing Skills II 45 0 45 2
    ARA 121 Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    PSY 121 Psychology 45 0 45 3
    BIO 121 General Biology 45 0 45 3
    MAT 121 Calculus 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
SOPHOMORE I  CHEM 211 Chemistry I  45  0 45 3
     CHEM 212  Introduction to Chemistry Lab  45  0  45  3
     MATH 211  Calculus II  45  0  45  3
     CSC 211  Introduction to Computers  45  0  45  3
     EDU 121  Introduction to Psychology  45  0  45  3
     ENG 211  Reading Skills  45 0  45  3
         TOTAL CU  15
  II  CHEM 221 Organic Chemistry I  45  0 45  3
     CHEM 222  Chemistry II  45  0  45  3
     PHY 111  General Physics  45  0  45  3
     MATH 221  Calculus III  45  0  45  3
     EDU 221  Educational Statistics  45  0  45  3
     EDU 211  Human Development  45  0  45  3
     ENG 221  Writing Skills  45 0  45 3
         TOTAL CU   21
 JUNIOR I CHEM 311  Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry  45 0 45 3
     CHEM 312  Oragic Chemistry II  45  0  45  3
     MATH 311  Linear Algebra  45  0  45  3
     SOM 311  Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
     EDU 222  Educational Psychology  45  0  45  3
     MATH 312  Probability and Statistics  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 321 Physical Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
           TOTAL CU  21
   II CHEM 322 Physica Chemistry II  45  0 45 3
     CHEM 323  Biochemistry  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 321  Analytical Chemistry I  45  0  45  3
     MATH 222  Geometry I  45  0  45  3
     EDU 322  Research Methods  45  0  45  3
     MATH 311  Differential Equations I  45 0  45  3
         TOTAL CU   18
 SENIOR I  CHEM 411 Senior Project 45  0 45 3
     CHEM 412  Environmental Chemistry  45  0  45  3
     EDU 311  Measurement and Evaluation in Education  45  0  45  3
     EDU 321  Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 414  Senior Project  45  0  45  3
     CHEM 413  Qualitative organic Analysis  45 0  45  3
           TOTAL CU  18
   II  CHEM 421  Advanced Inroganic Chemsitry  45  0 45  3
     CHEM 422  ICT in Chemistry  45  0  45  3
     EDU 421  Educational Management and Administration  45  0  45  3
     EDU 411  Curriculum Studies  45 0  45 3
           TOTAL CU  12

 

3. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (MATHEMATICS)

Introduction

The Department of Mathematics offers and guides all mathematics courses offered in the University. The Department offers both a major in Mathematics and a minor.  Students majoring in Mathematics are usually expected to minor in either Physics or Chemistry.


Philosophy

Students

The Department plans to produce students who can teach mathematics in Secondary schools and apply appropriate instructional methods for teaching mathematics. Students who graduate from the Department are also expected to be able to articulate, transfer intellectual competency, knowledge and skills effectively.

Goals

The goals of the Department of Mathematics are:

  • To produce high-quality secondary school teachers in Mathematics.
  • To produce qualified educational researchers in mathematics.
  • To produce students who will continue to learn mathematics and apply it is principles for the development of the society.

Course Requirements for Mathematics Major

Total number of courses required = 16        Total number of credit hours = 49

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

 1 MATH 212  Set Theory  3
 2 MATH 223  Number Theory  3
 3  MATH 222  Geometry I  3
 4  MATH 221  Calculus III  3
 5  MATH 224  Linear Algebra  3
 6  MATH 312  Calculus IV  3
 7  MATH 321  Abstract Algebra  3
 8  MATH 311  Differential Equations I  3
 9  MATH 213  Probability and Statistics  3
 10  MATH 322  Differential Equation II  3
 11  MATH 411  Geometry II  3
 12  MATH 422  Real Analysis  3
 13  MATH 421  Logic  3
 14  MATH 414  Integration of ICT into Math  3
 15  MATH 412  History and Philosophy of  Math  3
 16  MATH 413  Senior project  3
   TOTAL  49


 

Course Requirements for Physics Minor

Total number of courses required = 8          Total number of credit hours = 24

 

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

1 PHY 211 Introduction to Physics 3
2 PHY 212 Mechanics I 3
3 PHY 221 Properties of Matter 3
4 PHY 222 Waves and Optics 3
5 PHY 223 Experimental Physics 3
6 PHY 311 Thermodynamics 3
7 PHY 321 Electromagnetism 3
8 PHY 312 Intr. To Modern Physics 3
  24

 

Course Requirements for Chemistry Minor

Total number of courses required = 8          Total number of credit hours = 24

S/No.

Course Code

Course Name

Course Credits

1 CHEM 211  Chemistry I 3
2 CHEM 212  Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory 3
3  CHEM 221  Chemistry II 3
4  CHEM 222  Organic Chemistry I 3
5  CHEM 311  Organic chemistry II 3
6  CHEM 321  Physical chemistry I 3
7  CHEM 223  Qualitative Inorganic Chem. 3
8  CHEM 312  Analytical Chemistry     I 3
TOTAL 24

 

 

Bachelor of Science (Maths Major/Physics Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
YEAR SEMESTER COURSE CODE COURSE NAME L      P     CH    CU   
FRESHMAN I  ENG 111  Language Structure I 45 0 45 2
     ENG 112  Reading and Vocabulary I 45 0 45 2
     ENG 113  Writing Skills I 45 0 45 2
     ISL 111  Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
     SOC 111  Sociology 45 0 45 3
     GEO 111  World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
     MAT 111  Precalculus 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
  II  ENG 121 Language Structure II  45 0 45 2
     ENG 122  Reading and Vocabulary II 45 0 45 2
     ENG 123  Writing Skills II 45 0 45 2
     ARA 121  Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
     PSY 121  Psychology 45 0 45 3
     BIO 121  General Biology 45 0 45 3
     MAT 121  Calculus I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
 SOPHOMORE I  MATH 211    Calculus II  45  0 45  3
    MATH 212       Set Theory  45  0  45 3
    MATH 213        Probability and Statistics  45  0  45  3
    PHY 211     Mechanics I   45  0  45  3
    CSC 111     Introduction to Comp  45  0  45  3
    EDU 121     Intro. To Psychology  45  0  45  3
    PHY 111     Intro. To Physics I  45  0  45  3
    ENG 211      Reading Skills  45 0  45  3
           TOTAL CU  24
  II  MATH 221 Calculus III   45  0 45  3
     MATH 222  Geometry I  45  0  45  3
     MATH 223  Number Theory  45  0  45  3
     PHY 222  Waves and Optics  45  0  45  3
     PHY 212  Properties of Matter  45  0  45  3
     EDU 211  Human Development  45  0  45  3
     EDU 221  Educational Statistics  45  0  45 3
     ENG 221  Writing Skills 45 0 45 3
             24
 JUNIOR I  MATH 311 Differential Equation I  45  0 45  3
     MATH 312  Calculus IV  45  0  45  3
     SOM 311  Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
     EDU 222  Educational Psychology  45  0  45  3
     MATH 224  Linear Algebra  45  0  45  3
     PHY 311  Thermodynamics  45 0  45 3
         TOTAL CU  15
   II  MATH 221 Abstract Algebra   45  0 45  3
     MATH 222  Differential Equation II  45  0  45  3
     PHY 223  Experimental Physics  45  0  45  3
     EDU 321  Research Methodology  45  0  45  3
     PHY 313  Electromagnetism  45 0  45 3
          TOTAL CU  15
 SENIOR I MATH 411   Geometry II  45  0 45  3
     MATH 412  Hist. & Philosophy of Math  45  0  45  3
     MATH 413  Senior Project  45  0  45  3
     EDU 311  Measurement and Evaluation in Education  45  0  45  3
     EDU 322 Subject Teaching Methodology   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL CU  15
   II MATH 422   Real Analysis 45  0 45  3
     PHY 422  Integration of ICT and Physics  45  0  45  3
     EDU 421  Educational Mgt and Admin.  45  0  45  3
     EDU 411  Curriculum Studies  45  0  45  3
     MATH 421 Logic   45 0  45 3
        TOTAL CU    15

 

 

Bachelor of Science (Maths Major/Chemistry Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
YEAR SEMESTER COURSE CODE COURSE NAME L P CH CU
I I ARA 111    Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111    Sociology 45 0 45 3
    MATH 111     Pre-calculus 45 0 45 3
    BIO 111    Gen. Biology 45 0 45 3
    ENG 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 15
  II ISL 121    Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    MATH 121     Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    CHEM. 121    Gen. Chemistry 45 0 45 3
    ENG 121    Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 12
II I MATH 211    Calculus II 45 0 45 3
    MATH 212    Set Theory 45 0 45 3
    MATH 213    Probability and Statistics 45 0 45 3
    CHEM 211    Chemistry I 45 0 45 3
    CHEM 212    Intro. To Lab 45 0 45 3
    CSC 211    Introduction to Computer 45 0 45 3
    EDU 211    Intr. to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    ENG 211    Reading Skills 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
  II MATH 221     Calculus III  45  0 45  3
     MATH 222     Geometry I   45  0  45  3
     MATH 223     Number Theory   45  0  45  3
     MATH 224     Linear Algebra   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 221     Chemistry II   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 222     Organic Chemistry I   45  0  45  3
     EDU 222     Human Development   45  0  45  3
     EDU 221     Educational Statistics   45 0  45 3
        TOTAL CU    24
 III I MATH 311     Differential Equation I  45  0 45  3
     MATH 312     Calculus IV   45  0  45  3
     SOM 311     Somali Literature   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 311     Organic Chemistry II   45  0  45  3
     EDU 222     Educational Psychology   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL CU  15
  II  MATH 321     Abstract Algebra  45  0 45  3
     MATH 322     Differential Equation II   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 223     Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 321     Physical Chemistry I   45  0  45  3
     EDU 321     Research Methodology   45 0  45 3
         TOTAL CU   15
 IV I  MATH 411     Geometry II   45 0  45 3
    MATH 412     Hist. & Philosophy of Math   45  0  45  3
     MATH 413     Senior Project   45  0  45  3
     CHEM 312     Analytical Chemistry I   45  0  45  3
     EDU 322     Subject Teaching Methodology   45  0  45  3
     EDU 311     Measurement and Evaluation in Education   45  0 45  3
        TOTAL CU    18
   II  MATH 421     Logic  45  0 45  3
     MATH 422     Real Analysis   45  0  45  3
     EDU 421     Educational Mgt and Admin.   45  0  45  3
     EDU 411     Curriculum Studies   45  0  45  3
     MATH 323     ICT in Math   45 0  45 3
        TOTAL CU    15

 

4. BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION (PHYSICS)

 

Introduction
The Physics Department offers a wide range of physics courses that cater to the needs of an effective secondary school teacher. The Department currently offers both major and minor in physics. The Department also offers general courses required in other Faculties and Departments of the University. Students who major in Physics are usually expected to take Mathematics as a minor.

Philosophy
The Department is founded on the belief that physics has real-life benefits and applications. It also assumes that students, after they complete the requirements of their programs of study, will use their training to contribute to the advancement of their communities. The department also believes that good physics teachers should have the values of intellectual honesty, hard-work, creativity and respect for others.  

Students
The courses and programs of the Department are structured to produce students with the ability to:

  • Know and creatively apply the principles of physics and use the environment as a physics lab.
  • Use modern technology to teach and use physics.
  • Think clearly and methodologically in problem solving.
  • Ability to interact with, communicate and teach secondary students effectively.

Goals
The goals of the Department include:

  1. Provide quality instruction in physics
  2. Improve quality of physics at the Secondary level.
  3. Provide other Faculties with appropriate courses.

 

Course Requirements for Physics Major

Total number of courses required = 17       Total number of credit hours = 49

Serial No. Course Code  Course Name Course Credits
 1 Phy. 111   Introduction to Physics I  3
 2  Phy. 311  Thermodynamics  3
 3  Phy. 211  Mechanics I  3
 4  Phy. 212  Properties of Matter  3
 5  Phy. 223  Experimental Physics  3
 6  Phy. 411  Atomic Physics  3
 7  Phy. 222  Waves and Optics  3
 8  Phy. 221  Mechanics II  3
 9  Phy. 313  Electromagnetism  3
 10  Phy. 322  Quantum Physics & Relativity  3
 11  Phy. 421  Astronomy  3
 12  Phy. 312  Solid State Physics  3
 13  Phy. 413  Senior Project  3
 14  Phy. 321  Electronics  3
 15  Phy. 412  Nuclear & Particle Physics  3
 16  Phy. 422  Integration of ICT into Physics  3
 TOTAL   48

 

 

Course Requirements for mathematics Minor

Total number of courses required = 8         Total number of credit hours = 24

Serial No. Course Code Course Name  Course Credits
 1 Math. 221  Calculus III   3
 2  Math. 213  Probability and Statistics  3
 3  Math. 311  Differential Equation I  3
 4  Math. 222  Geometry I  3
 5  Math. 224  Linear Algebra  3
 6  Math. 212  Set Theory  3
 7  Math. 223  Number Theory  3
 8  Math. 321  Abstract Algebra  3
    TOTAL  24

 

 

Bachelor of Science (Physics Major/Maths Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
YEAR SEMESTER Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I ARA 111    Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111    Sociology 45 0 45 3
    MATH 111     Pre-calculus 45 0 45 3
    BIO 111    Gen. Biology 45 0 45 3
    ENG 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 2
    ARA 111    Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 17
  II ISL 121    Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    MATH 121     Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    CHEM. 121    Gen. Chemistry 45 0 45 3
    ENG 121    Freshman English II 45 0 45 2
    ISL 121    Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 15
II I PHY 211    Mechanics I 45 0 45 3
    PHY 212    Properties of Matter 45 0 45 3
    MATH 211    Calculus II 45 0 45 3
    CSC 211    Intro. To computers 45 0 45 3
    EDU 111    Intr. to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    ENG 211    Writing Skills 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL CU 18
   II  PHY 221      Mechanics II  45  0 45 3
    PHY 222   Waves and Optics  45  0  45  3
    PHY 223   Experimental Physics  45  0  45  3
    MATH 221   Calculus III  45  0  45  3
    EDU 221   Educational Statistics  45  0  45  3
    EDU 212   Human Development 45 0 45 3
    Eng 221   Reading Skills  45 0  45  3
         TOTAL CU   18
 III I  PHY 311  Thermodynamics  45  0 45  3
     PHY 312  Solid State Physics  45  0  45  3
    PHY 313      Electromagnetism  45  0  45  3
    SOM 311   Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
    EDU 222   Educational Psychology  45  0  45  3
    MATH 224   Linear Algebra  45 0  45 3
         TOTAL CU   18
   II  PHY 321  Electronics  45  0 45  3
    PHY 322   Quantum Physics and Relativity  45  0  45  3
    MATH 222   Geometry I  45  0  45  3
    MATH 311      Differential Equation I  45  0  45  3
    EDU 321   Research Methods  45  0  45  3
    PHY 323  Geometry Optics  45 0  45 3
          TOTAL CU  18
 IV I  PHY 411  Atomic Physics  45  0 45  3
    PHY 412   Nuclear and Particle Physics  45  0  45  3
    PHY 413     Measurement and Evaluation  45  0  45  3
    EDU 311   Measurement and Evaluation  45  0  45  3
    EDU 322   Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45 0  45 3
         TOTAL CU   15
   II  PHY 411  Atomic Physics  45  0 45  3
    PHY 412   Nuclear and Particle Physics  45  0  45  3
    PHY 413   Senior Project  45  0  45  3
    EDU 311      Measurement and Evaluation  45  0  45  3
    EDU 322   Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45 0  45 3
          TOTAL CU  15
 IV I  PHY 421  Astronomy  45  0 45  3
    PHY 422   Integration of Physics into ICT  45  0  45  3
    EDU 421   Educational Mgt and Admin  45  0  45  3
    PHY 422     Applied Electricity  45  0  45  3
    EDU 411   Curriculum Studies  45 0  45 3
          TOTAL CU  15

 

5. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (GEOGRAPHY)

Introduction
The Department of Geography is part of the Department of Social Sciences. It offers a degree program of concentration with a minor in History or English.

Philosophy
The Geography Department exists to contribute to the generation of new ideas and values in order to improve the general world view of the learners and establish among them a culture of sustainable development. The Department believes in the production of citizens who understand and appreciate global relations and who can interpret geographical phenomena in order to understand the world better.

Students
The Department intends to produce students with the following characteristics:

  • Students with the ability to import new ideas and values.
  • Globally oriented citizens in all aspects of life.
  • Students with the ability to relate the theoretical aspects of their subject in solving day-to-day problems.

Goals

The following are the goals of the Department:

  • To enable the learners acquire a thorough background knowledge of content and methodology of teaching geography.
  • To enable the learners appreciate the relevance of geography in national development.
  • To enable the learner understand and appreciate the need to conserve and sustain the environment.
  • To enable the learner acquire the ability to relate theoretical aspects of geography to the immediate environment.

 

Course Requirements for Geography Major

Total number of courses = 17                      Total number of credit hours = 52

Serial No. Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1  Geo. 212         Physical Geography I                      3
 2  Geo. 223          Weather and Climate I  3
 3  Geo. 111         World Regional Geography   3
 4  Geo. 323        Quantitative Analysis   3
 5  Geo. 211        Cartography I   3
 6  Geo. 413         Geography of Africa   3
 7  Geo. 221         Population and Settlement   3
 8  Geo. 222        Physical Geography II   3
 9  Geo. 311        Economic Geography   3
 10  Geo. 312         Weather and Climate II   3
 11  Geo. 321         Political Geography   3
 12  Geo. 322         Cartography II   3
 13  Geo. 411         Management and Conservation of Environment   3
 14  Geo. 412         Rural Development and Community Planning   3
 15  Geo. 421         Environmental Education   3
 16  Geo. 422         Biogeography   3
 17  Geo. 414         Senior Project   3
   Total  52

 

Course Requirements for History Minor

Total number of courses = 8                          Total number of credit hours = 24

Serial No. Course Code Course Name Course  Credits
 1  His. 121 Ancient History   3
 2  His. 211  Ancient History I  3
 3  His. 221  World History I  3
 4  His. 311  Islamic History I  3
 5  His. 322  Somali History  3
 6  His. 321  Islamic History II  3
 7  His. 411  World History II  3
 8  His. 421  African History II  3
 Total   24

 

Bachelor of Arts (Geography Major/History Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P TH CH
I I ARA 111 Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111 Sociology 45 0 45 3
    MATH 111 Pre-calculus 45 0 45 3
    HIS 111 Somali History 45 0 45 3
    ENG 111 Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
    ARA 111 Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II ISL 121 Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    MATH 121 Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    GEO 121 World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
    ENG 121 Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
    ISL 121 Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
 II I GEO 211   Cartography I  45  0 45  3
     GEO 212  Physical Geography I  45  0  45  3
     HIS 211  African History I  45  0  45  3
     CSC 211  Intro. To Computer  45  0  45  3
     EDU 111  Intr. to Psychology  45  0  45  3
     EDU 211 Writing Skills   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  18
   II  GEO 221  Population and Settlement 45  0 45  3
     GEO 222  Physical Geography II  45  0  45  3
     HIS 221  World History I  45  0  45  3
     EDU 221  Educational Statistics  45  0  45  3
     EDU 211  Human Development  45  0  45  3
     GEO 223 Weather & Climate I   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  18
 III I  GEO 311  Economic Geography  45  0 45  3
    GEO312  Weather & Climate II  45  0  45  3
     HIS 311  Islamic History I  45  0  45  3
     SOM 311  Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
     EDU 222 Educational Psychology   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  15
   II  GEO 321  Political Geography 45  0 45  3
     GEO 322  Cartography II  45  0  45  3
     HIS 321  Islamic History II  45  0  45  3
     EDU 322  Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45  0  45  3
     EDU 321  Research Methods  45  0  45  3
     GEO 323 Quantitative Analysis   45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  21
 IV I  GEO 411  Man.  and Con. of Environment 45  0 45  3
     GEO 412  Rural Development and Community Planning  45  0  45  3
     GEO 413  Geography of Africa  45  0  45  3
     HIS 411  World History II  45  0  45  3
     GEO 414  Senior Project  45  0  45  3
     EDU 311 Measurement and Evaluation in Education   45 0  45 3
          TOTAL  18
   II GEO 421  Environmental Education   45  0 45  3
    GEO 422   Biogeography  45  0  45  3
     HIS 421  African History II  45  0  45  3
     EDU 421  Educational Mgt and Admin.  45  0  45  3
     EDU 411  Curriculum Studies  45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  15

 

6. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (ENGLISH)

Introduction

The English Department offers a wide range of courses that are intended to enable the student master the language as well as teach.  Student can English both as a major and as a minor. The Department also offers Diploma in English. In addition, the General English courses which are also required in other Faculties and Departments of the University are offered in the English Department.

Philosophy
Since English is an international language spoken throughout the world, our philosophy is to be part of the world community.

Students
The Department intends to produce students who can communicate effectively in English and continue to study English as life-long learners.

Goal Statement

The goal of the Department is to train and equip effective English teachers at the Secondary School level.

 

Course Requirements for English Major

Total number of courses = 17                        Total number of credit hours = 52

Serial No. Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1  Eng. 211  Reading Skills  3
 2  Eng. 212  Communicative Grammar  3
 3  Eng. 213  Listening Skills  3
 4  Eng. 221  Intro. To language and Linguistics  3
 5  Eng. 222  Spoken English I  3
 6  Eng. 223  Fundamentals of Literature  3
 7  Eng. 312  Intermediate Writing  3
 8  Eng. 313  Spoken English II  3
 9  Eng. 321  Advanced Writing Skills  3
 10  Eng. 322  The Novel  3
 11  Eng. 323  English Phonetics and Phonology  3
 12  Eng. 224  Critical Reading  3
 13  Eng. 412  English Morphology and Syntax  3
 14  Eng. 413  Translation and Interpretation  3
 15  Eng. 421  Business Communication  3
 16  Eng. 422  African  Literature  3
 17  Eng. 424  Senior Project  3
     TOTAL  52

 

Course Requirements for History Minor

Total number of courses = 8                         Total number of credit hours = 24

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1  His. 121  Ancient History  3
 2  His. 211  African History I  3
 3  His. 221  World History I  3
 4  His. 311  Islamic History I  3
 5  His. 322  Somali History  3
 6  His. 321  Islamic History II  3
 7  His. 411  World History II  3
 8  His. 421  African History II  3
                   Total   24

 

Bachelor of Arts in Education (English Major/History Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I ENG 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
    ARA 111    Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111    Sociology 45 0 45 3
    GEO 111     World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
    BIO 111    General Biology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II ENG 121    Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
    ISL 121    Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    MATH 121    Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    HIS 121     Ancient History 45 0 45 3
    EDU 121     Intro. To Psychology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
 II I  ENG 211    Listening Skills   45 0  45 3
    ENG 212     Reading Skills   45  0  45  3
    HIS 211      African History I  45  0  45  3
    CSC 211      Intro to Computers  45  0  45  3
    EDU 111      Intr. to Psychology  45  0  45  3
    ENG 213      Intermediate Writing  45  0 45  3
         TOTAL   18
   II  ENG 221     Spoken English I  45 0  45 3
    ENG 222      Critical Reading  45  0  45  3
    HIS 221      World History I  45  0  45  3
    EDU 211      Human Development  45  0  45  3
    EDU 221      Educational Statistics  45  0  45  3
    ENG 223      Communicative Grammar  45  0 45  3
          TOTAL  18
 III I  ENG 311     Intr. to Language and Linguistics  45  0 45  3
    ENG 312      Fundamentals of Literature  45  0  45  3
    SOM 311      Somali Literature  45  0  45  3
    HIS 311     Islamic History I  45  0  45  3
    ENG 323      Spoken English II  45  0  45  3
    EDU 222   Educational Psychology  45 0  45 3
         TOTAL   18
   II  ENG 321    English Phonetics and Phonology   45  0 45  3
    ENG 322      Business Communication  45  0  45  3
    HIS 321      Islamic History II  45  0  45  3
    HIS 411      World History II  45  0  45  3
    EDU 321      Research Methods  45 0  45 3
           TOTAL  15
 IV I ENG 412   Advanced Writing Skills  45  0  45  3
    ENG 414    Senior Project  45  0  45  3
    ENG 414  The Novel  45  0  45  3
    EDU 322     Subject Teaching Methodology and Practicum  45  0  45  3
    ENG 413        English Morphology and Syntax  45  0  45  3
    EDU 311     Measurement and Evaluation in Education  45  0  45  3
           TOTAL  18
  II  ENG 421     Translation and Interpretation  45  0 45  3
    ENG 422   African Literature  45  0  45  3
     HIS 421  African History II  45  0  45  3
     EDU 421      Educational Mgt and Admin.  45  0  45  3
    EDU 411      Curriculum Studies  45 0  45 3
           TOTAL 15

 

7. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION (HISTORY)

 

General statement

The department of History is part of the division of social sciences and was establish in 2003 as a diploma program for two years duration. Diploma in education was upgraded to a degree program which offers usually with a minor in Geography or English. Students majoring in History are expected to complete 17 courses in their major area and 8 courses in the minor field, In order to graduate a student should attain a minimum of 124 credit hours.

Goal statement


After graduation, students are required to fulfill the following goals:

  1. Mastery of his/her major area of study
  2. Carry out research on his/her major area of study
  3. Fulfill such national needs as-
    • teaching secondary schools
    • applying his/her academic career effectively

 

Course Requirements for Major in History

Total number of Courses = 17           Total number of credit hours = 52

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1  Hist.  211  Ancient History  3
2  Hist.  212  African History I  3
3  Hist.  221  World History I since 150  3
4  Hist.  311  African History II  since 1800  3
5  Hist.  322  World History II since 1800  3
6  Hist.  323  Near East I  3
7  Hist.  421  Near East II  3
8  Hist.  223  Somali History  I  3
9  Hist.  224  Contemporary World History  3
10  Hist.  412  Introduction to archaeology  3
11  Hist.  413  History of U. S. A.  3
12  Hist.  421  Near East III  3
13  Hist.  423  Contemporary African History  3
14  Hist.  424  Historiography  3
15  Hist.  421  Senior project  3
16  Hist.  425  History of Latin America  3
17  Hist.  324 Somali History II   3
     TOTAL  52

 

 

Bachelor of Arts in Education (History Major/English Minor)
Yearly/Semester distribution of courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I ENG 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
    ARA 111    Freshman Arabic 45 0 45 3
    MATH 111    Pre-calculus 45 0 45 3
    SOC 111    Sociology 45 0 45 3
    GEO 111     World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
    BIO 111    General Biology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II ENG 121    Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
    ISL 121    Islamic Studies 45 0 45 3
    MATH 121    Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    HIS 121    Somali History 45 0 45 3
    EDU 121    Intro. To Psychology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
II I ENG 211    Listening Skills 45 0 45 3
      Ancient History 45 0 45 3
    HIS 211    African History I 45 0 45 3
    CSC 211    Intro to Computers 45 0 45 3
    EDU 111    Intr. to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Som 100    Somali Literature 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II ENG 221    Spoken English I 45 0 45 3
    HIS 311     Islamic History I 45 0 45 3
    HIS 221     World History I 45 0 45 3
    EDU 211     Human Development 45 0 45 3
    EDU 221    Educational Statistics 45 0 45 3
      Intermediate Writing 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
III I ENG 311    Intr. to Language and Linguistics 45 0 45 3
    ENG 312    Fundamentals of Literature 45 0 45 3
    HIS 311    Islamic History II 45 0 45 3
    EDU 222    Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
    His 312    Contemporary World History 45 0 45 3
    His 313    Near East I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  IV ENG 223    Communicative Grammar 45 0 45 3
    His 322    African History II 45 0 45 3
    HIS 321     World History II 45 0 45 3
    EDU 321    Research Methods 45 0 45 3
    His 323    History of USA 45 0 45 3
    Eng 321    Critical Reading 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18

 

8. DIPLOMA IN EDUCATION

 

The Diploma in Education Program has been established in 2002 with the aim of producing high quality secondary school teachers who mitigate the urgent need for teachers in the country. The program was intended to continue for two years and help students study the areas of science, mathematics, social studies, languages (Arabic and English) and Islamic Studies. In order to increase the effectiveness of the teachers and the efficiency  of the program, students have double majors and, after successful completion of the requirements, can teach two closely related subjects.

Mission

To produce high quality secondary school teachers.

 

Vision

Improving quality and increase in accessibility of Education for youngsters.


Objectives of the Programme

  • To equip learners with critical understanding of the respective subjects taught in secondary schools.
  • To enable learners to understand the diverse methods and strategies used in teaching.
  • To produce personnel to offer teaching and administrative services in schools, colleges, and any other settings both in Somaliland and in the region.

 

General Requirement Courses for the Program

Total Number of Courses: 10    Total Number of Credit Hours: 27

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 Edu 100 Introduction to Psychology   3
2 Edu 200  Human Development  3
3 Edu 410  Subject Teaching Method.  4
4 Edu 210  Educational Psychology  3
5 Edu 420  Meas and Eval in Edu  3
6 Edu 100  Freshman English I  3
7 Edu 110  Freshman English II  3
8 Edu 200  Reading Skills  3
9 Edu 210  Writing Skills 3
     TOTAL  28

 

 

Course Requirements for Biology and Chemistry Majors

Biology Courses
Total Number of Biology Courses: 8    Total Number of Credit Hours: 24

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 Bio 211 General Zoology  3
2 Bio 212 General Botany  3
3 Bio 121 Cell Biology  3
4 Bio 322 Microbiology  3
5 Bio 311 Human Anat. and Phys. I  3
6 Bio 314 Practical Biology  3
7 Bio 323 Ecology  3
8 Bio 412 Genetics  3
    TOTAL  24

 

Chemistry Courses
Total Number of Chemistry Courses: 6    Total Numbers of Credit Hours: 18
Serial Numbers Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 Chem. 211 Chemistry I 3
2 Chem. 212 Intro. To Laboratory Chemistry 3
3 Chem. 221 Chemistry II 3
4 Chem. 222 Organic Chemistry I 3
5 Chem. 311 Organic Chemistry II 3
6 Chem. 321 Physical Chemistry I 3
7 Chem. 312 Analytical Chemistry I 3
8 Chem. 223 Qualitative Inorganic Chemistry 3
    TOTAL 24

 

 

Diploma in Education (Biology/Chemistry Majors)
Year/Semesterly Distribution of Courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I Bio. 211     General Zoology 45 0 45 3
    Bio.121    Cell Biology 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 211    Chemistry I 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 212    Intro to Chem. Laboratory 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 121    Intro to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II Bio. 212     General Botany 45 0 45 3
    Bio. 311    Human Anat. & Physiology 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 221    Chemistry II 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 222    Organic Chemistry I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 211    Human Development 45 0 45 3
    Eng 121    Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
II I Bio. 322    Microbiology 45 0 45 3
    Bio. 314    Practical Biology 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 311    Organic Chemistry II 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 322    Subject Teaching Method 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 211    English III 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 321    Physical Chemistry I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 222   Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 21
  II Bio. 323     General Ecology 45 0 45 3
    Bio. 412    Genetics 45 0 45 3
    Chem.223    Qualitative Inorganic Chem. 45 0 45 3
    Chem. 312    Analytical Chemistry I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 311    Meas. And Eval in Education 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 221    English IV 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18

 

Course Requirements for Social Studies Majors

Geography Courses
Total Number of Geography Courses: 8    Total Numbers of Credit Hours: 24

 Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1 Geo 311  Economic Geography  3
 2  Geo 221  Population and Settlement  3
 3  Geo 313  Weather and Climate  3
 4  Geo 212  Physical Geography I  3
 5  Geo 111  World Reg. Geography  3
 6  Geo 211  Cartography I  3
 7  Geo 222  Physical Geography II  3
 8  Geo 423  Qualitative Analysis  3
     TOTAL  24

 

History Courses
Total number of courses = 8                          Total number of credit hours = 24
Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 His. 121 Ancient History 3
2 His. 211 African History I 3
3 His. 221 World History I 3
4 His. 311 Islamic History I 3
5 His. 322 Somali History 3
6 His. 321 Islamic History II 3
7 His. 411 World History II 3
8 His. 421 African History II 3
    TOTAL 24

 

 

Diploma in Education (Geography/History Majors)
Year/Semesterly Distribution of Courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I Geo. 212     Physical Geography I 45 0 45 3
    Geo.313    Weather and Climate 45 0 45 3
    His. 121    Ancient History 45 0 45 3
    His. 211    African History I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 121    Intro to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II Geo. 111     World Regional Geography 45 0 45 3
    Geo. 423    Quantitative Analysis 45 0 45 3
    His. 221    World History I 45 0 45 3
    His. 311    Islamic History I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 211    Human Development 45 0 45 3
    Eng 211    Freshman English II 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
II I Geo. 211     Cartography I 45 0 45 3
    Geo. 311    Economic Geography 45 0 45 3
    His. 322    Somali History 45 0 45 3
    His.321    Islamic History II 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 322    Subject Teaching Method 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 311    Meas. And Eval in Education 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 211    English III 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 21
  II Geo. 221     Population and Settlement 45 0 45 3
    Geo. 222    Physical Geography II 45 0 45 3
    His. 421    African History II 45 0 45 3
    His. 411    World History II 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 222    Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 221    English IV 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18

 

Course Requirements for Physics and Mathematics Majors

Physics Courses
Total Number of Physics Courses: 8    Total Numbers of Credit Hours: 24

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1  Phy. 111 Intro. To Physics I  3
2  Phy. 211  Mechanics I 3
3  Phy. 311  Thermodynamics 3
4  Phy. 223  Experimental Physics 3
5  Phy. 212  Properties of Matter 3
6  Phy. 313  Electromagnetism 3
7  Phy.   Intro. To Modern Physics 3
8  Phy. 222  Waves and Optics 3
     TOTAL 24

 

 

 

 
Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 Math. 111 Precalculus 3
2 Math. 312 Probability and Statistics 3
3 Math. 121 Calculus I 3
4 Math. 222 Geometry I 3
5 Math. 211 Calculus II 3
6 Math. 224 Linear Algebra 3
7 Math. 221 Abstract Algebra 3
8 Math. 212 Set Theory 3
      24

 

Diploma in Education (Physics and Math Majors)
Year/Semesterly Distribution of Courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I Phy. 111     Intro. To Physics I 45 0 45 3
    Phy. 211    Mechanics I 45 0 45 3
    Math. 111    Precalculus 45 0 45 3
    Math. 213     Probability and Statistics 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 121    Intro to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II Phy. 212     Properties of Matter 45 0 45 3
    Phy. 222    Waves and Optics 45 0 45 3
    Math. 121    Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    Math. 222     Geometry I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 211    Human Development 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
II I Phy. 311     Thermodynamics 45 0 45 3
    Phy. 223     Experimental Physics 45 0 45 3
    Math. 211    Calculus II 45 0 45 3
    Math. 224     Linear Algebra 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 322    Subject Teaching Method 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 222    Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 211    English III 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 21
  II Phy. 313     Electromagnetism 45 0 45 3
    Phy. 222    Intro. To Modern Physics 45 0 45 3
    Math. 324     Abstract Algebra 45 0 45 3
    Math.212    Set Theory 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 311    Measurement & Evaluation 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 221    English IV 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18

 

Course Requirements for Agriculture Majors and Biology Minors

Agriculture Courses
Total Number of Agriculture Courses: 8     Total Number of Credit Hours: 24

Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1 Agri. 211  Intro. To Agric. Education   3
 2  Agri. 221  Principles of Crop Production  3
 3  Agri. 212  Soil Science  3
 4  Agri. 222  Horticulture I  3
 5  Agri. 321  Farm Equipment and Building  3
 6  Agri. 311  Animal Health and Hygiene  3
 7  Agri. 411  Farm Management  3
 8  Agri. 322  Poultry Production 3
       24

 

 

Biology Courses
Total Number of Biology Courses: 8       Total Number of Credit Hours: 24
Serial Number Course Code Courese Name Course Credits
1 Bio 211 General Zoology 3
2 Bio 212 General Botany 3
3 Bio 121 Cell Biology 3
4 Bio 322 Microbiology 3
5 Bio 311 Human Anat. and Phys. I 3
6 Bio 314 Practical Biology 3
7 Bio 323 Ecology 3
8 Bio 412 Genetics 3
    TOTAL 24

 

 

Diploma in Education (Agriculture/Biology Majors)
Year/Semesterly Distribution of Courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I Agri.     Intro. To Agric. Education 45 0 45 3
    Agri.    Soil Science 45 0 45 3
    Bio 121    Cell Biology 45 0 45 3
    Bio 211    Zoology I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 121    Intro to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
          18
  II Agri.      Principles of Crop Production 45 0 45 3
    Agri.     Livestock Production 45 0 45 3
    Bio 221    Botany I

45

0 45 3
    Bio 311    Human Anatomy & Physiiology I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 211    Human Development 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
II I Agri 222    Horticulture 45 0 45 3
    Agri 221    Animal Health and Hygiene 45 0 45 3
    Bio 313    Practical Biology 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 322    Subject Teaching Method 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 311    Meas. And Eval in Education 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 211    English III 45 0 45 3
    Bio 322    Microbiology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 21
  II Agri 312    Farm Equipment and Building 45 0 45 3
    Agri 321    Farm Management 45 0 45 3
    Agri 222    Poultry Production 45 0 45 3
    Bio 412    Genetics 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 222    Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 221    English IV 45 0 45 3
    Bio 323    General Ecology 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 21

 

 

Course Requirements for Business/Math Majors

Business Courses
Total Number of Business Courses: 8 Total Numbers of Credit Hours: 24

 Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
 1 Adm 211   Business Courses 3
 2  Adm 212  Introduction to Business  3
 3  Adm 213  Introduction to Management  3
 4  Adm 221  Fundamentals of Financial Accounting  3
 5  Adm 222  Small Business Management  3
 6  Adm 223  Business English  3
 7  Adm 311  Basic Marketing  3
 8  Adm 312 Managerial Accounting   3
     TOTAL  24

 

 

Mathematics Courses
Total Number of Math Courses: 8    Total Number of Credit Hours: 24
Serial Number Course Code Course Name Course Credits
1 Math. 111 Pre-calculus 3
2 Math. 213 Probability and Statistics 3
3 Math. 121 Calculus I 3
4 Math. 222 Geometry I 3
5 Math. 211 Calculus II 3
6 Math. 224 Linear Algebra 3
7 Math. 221 Abstract Algebra 3
8 Math. 212 Set Theory 3
      24

 

 

Diploma in Education (Business/Maths Majors)
Year/Semesterly Distribution of Courses
Year Semester Course Code Course Name L P CH CU
I I Adm.      Intro. To Business 45 0 45 3
    Adm.    Business English 45 0 45 3
    Math. 111    Precalculus 45 0 45 3
    Math. 213    Probability and Statistics 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 121    Intro to Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 111    Freshman English I 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 18
  II Adm.      Intro. To Management 45 0 45 3
    Adm.     Financial Accounting 45 0 45 3
    Math. 121    Calculus I 45 0 45 3
    Math. 222    Geometry I 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 211    Human Development 45 0 45 3
        TOTAL 15
II I Adm.      Small Business Management 45 0 45 3
    Adm.     Basic Marketing 45 0 45 3
    Math. 211    Calculus II 45 0 45 3
    Math. 324    Abstract Algebra 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 322    Subject Teaching Method 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 311    Meas. And Eval in Education 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 211    English III 45 0 45 3
              21
  II Adm.      Merchandizing Transactions 45 0 45 3
    Adm.       45 0 45 3
    Math. 224     Linear Algebra 45 0 45 3
    Math.212    Set Theory 45 0 45 3
    Edu. 222    Educational Psychology 45 0 45 3
    Eng. 221    English IV 45 0 45 3
          18

 

 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

Edu. 211            Introduction to Psychology
Definition: its objective and its method. Heredity environment and human development. Nervous system and consciousness. Sensory process and perception. Cognitive process memory, language and thought. Learning process. Emotions and motivation personality: definition, theories and evaluation. Mental health; abnormal behaviour and therapeutic approaches. Social psychology: definition, basic concepts and applications.

Edu. 221            Child Psychology
This course is a survey of the process of human development from birth through adolescence.  Development is considered with regard to physical, physiological, intellectual, emotional, social, moral and personality dimensions.  The course concludes with an examination of Piaget’s theory of intellectual development.

Edu. 311            Educational Psychology
This course is a survey of psychology to the learning and teaching process.  Topics include: the nature of intelligence and its measurement, exceptionally in children, principles of learning, motivation in the classroom, attitudes and values and their development.

Edu. 321            Research Methodology
The course should produce teachers who are competent and knowledgeable in research methodologies and who apply research approaches to generate new solutions to problems encountered in the school.

Edu. 412            Measurement and Evaluation
This course surveys techniques of educational measurement and principles of evaluation in education. Topics include: the role of objectives in education, the use of specification tables, validity and reliability, classroom testing, comparison of objective and essay tests, test construction and the use of statistical tools in preparation, scoring, and interpretation of classroom tests.

Edu. 421            Curriculum Development
This course provides a survey of the decision-making process in curriculum development.  Topics include: sociological, psychological and philosophical foundations of curriculum, objectives of the secondary school curriculum in modern Somalia, major types of curriculum organization, the core program, successful practices, trends in the separate subjects, and organization for curriculum development.


Teaching Methodology
This course is based on the current knowledge of teaching, and makes an important contribution to teacher education, in that it furthers the professional knowledge base of teaching for beginning teachers. Explore professional future for teacher education, and consider the action of helping novice teachers to become agents of change as they enter the school system as professionals.

Edu. 422            Educational Management
Educational management and administration is a course which provides the students with principal theories and practices of management and administration in educational organizations. This course has been made to widen both the breadth and depth of the body of knowledge in this area of specialization. The content and the materials of the course incorporate detail, wide coverage as well as simplicity in the provision of scintillating examples in educational settings which capture and maintain the learners’ interest.

 

 

GENERAL REQUIREMENT COURSES DESCRIPTIONS

Math 111                Pre-calculus
Topics include: basic algebra, trigonometry, basic geometry, algebra of matrices, and introduction to calculus.

Math 121                Calculus I

Topics include: propositional logic, sets and relations, mathematical systems, real number system, system of sets and probability, matrix and determinants.   Also include functions and their graphs, circular, exponential and polynomial functions and vectors

Math 2                           Calculus II

Topics: rate of change of a function (increments, slopes of a line, equation of straight line, graphs, slope of curve, derivatives of a function), limits (definitions, theorems, applications to area), derivatives of algebraic functions (polynomial functions rational functions, inverse functions, chain rule, formulae for differentiation and continuity), application of differentiation.   


Eng. 111/121            Freshman English I & II

Each course is one semester; together they provide an integrated comprehensive remedial course in English language.  Major emphasis is not placed on traditional grammar, but one the oral practices of the living language with exhaustive exercises in comprehension and vocabulary building.  In addition to the detailed study of the prescribed oral language passages, various exercises in language structure are utilized that aim at strict practice in correct usage of different parts of speech and punctuation.  Handout materials and other aids to supplement classroom teaching will be supplied at the discretion of the instructor.  The prescribed text for these courses is – College English.

Eng 112/122             Writing Skills I & II

The course introduces the principles of writing, and in particular involves in dealing with a variety of techniques ranging from free writing, where the student does not need to be inhibited from practicing writing, since mistakes are not being checked or marked red by the instructor, to writing effective paragraphs. Topic of study in the semester will include, for example, understanding main idea sentence, developing main idea sentence, using supporting details or specific evidences; and the bases for evaluating wiring –unity, support, coherence and sentence skills.

Eng. 113/123            Reading skills

The course presents a systematic approach to college textbook material that makes students more efficient in their reading and studying. The course text is on comprehension, but in addition to the essential comprehension skills, it presents study skills that are also integral to success in college.
The course emphasize essential main ideas and supporting details. It also includes reading skills such as predicting and questioning, organizing, and rehearsing of textbook material to be learned.


Phy. 211            Introduction to Physics

This course is intended for students not concentrating in Physics, Mathematics or Chemistry. Emphasis is on energy, beginning with kinematics and dynamics, and including units on oscillatory motion, electric and magnetic energy, atomic and planetary systems and heat.


Geo. 111            World Regional Geography

This course provides a geographic survey of four major regions of the Earth; the Near East, Asia, the Americas, and Europe. Topics include: natural settings; natural resources; population distribution; important occupations; and, the problems of future development.


BIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Bio. 211            Zoology I
This is a study of the morphological and physiological principles of animal life as revealed by the various major phyla of Invertebrates (Protozoa through Arthropoda) with emphasis on Insecta.  The course is introduced with a survey of the structural and functional organization of animal life, science of zoology, protoplasm and cell, and architectural patterns of animals.  Local and/or continental forms are emphasized.

Bio. 212            Botany I
This is a study of the morphological and evolutionary principles of plant life as revealed by the various major subdivisions of the thallophyte.  The course discusses general systematics, morphology, life history, and evolutionary trend of the thallophyte.        

Bio. 221            Zoology II
This is a continuation of Zoology I.  It consists of the study of biology of the non-chordates, mollusca and echinodermata, as well as the basic taxonomy, morphology, distribution and life history of chordata. Pre-requisite, Zoology I

Bio. 222            Botany II
This is a continuation of Botany I.  The course deals with the basic taxonomy, morphology, life history and evolution of embryophytes.  It emphasizes the study of flower morphology, floral diagram and formulae, leaf morphology and phyllotaxy, and root system of flowering plants. Pre-requisite, Botany I

Bio. 311             Human Anatomy & Physiology I
This course covers the organization of the human body as a whole.  Topics include anatomy and physiology of skeletal, muscular, and reproductive systems together with the systems integration, control and maintenance of body metabolism.  Prerequisite: Zoology I and II.  Chemistry II may be taken concurrently.


Bio. 311            Tropical Crops and Pests
This is an introductory course.  It is intended to familiarize the student with tropical crops in general and those of economic importance in particular, with special reference to locally cultivated crops.  The course surveys the biology, history, ecology, pathology and cultivation methods of individual crops such as maize, sorghum, sugar cane, banana, beans, sesame, cassava, melons, and others.  The course requires both classroom and fieldwork.  Prerequisite: Botany I and II.


Bio. 421            Vertebrate Embryology
This course is a detailed study of the development of an organism from hatching or birth.  It includes processes of development and developmental stages of vertebrate with emphasis on the frog, chick, and human embryo development.  Prerequisite: Zoology I and II.

Bio. 411            Genetics
This course includes a detailed study of classical transmission of genetic information and provides an introduction to the principles of human and microbiotic genetics.  

Bio. 412            Plant Anatomy and Physiology
This course includes a detailed study of the structures of developing and mature seed plants.  Topics discussed include the internal organizational of the plant body (types of cells and tissues), the embryo and development of the adult plant from the embryo, the primary and secondary state of growth, adventitious roots and other structural types of roots and stems, histology, development and variations of the leaf, the flower, the fruit; and the seed.  This course is a study of water relations in plants, plant nutrition, plant growth and development and the endogenous plant growth hormone.  Prerequisite: Botany I and II.

Bio. 322            General Ecology
This course examines relationships of plants and animals to their environments, both physical and biotic.  Also discussed is distribution and interrelationships of landforms.  The course will include visits to typical local plant and animal communities.  Prerequisite: Zoology I & II, Botany I & II.

Bio. 321            Vertebrate Comparative Anatomy
This course surveys the evolution of organs and organ systems and presents a comparison of structure in vertebrate classes.  Homologous, analogous and prototype structures of lower forms will be examined in relation to mammalian structures:  prerequisite: Zoology I and II.

Bio. 422            Community Health
Public health services will be studies and how they affect the community.  Analysis and investigation of the most common health problems in Somalia will be emphasized.  A community health centre will be visited.  International collaboration towards combating the outbreak of epidemics and pandemic will be investigated.  Prerequisite: Zoology I and II.

Bio. 423            Biochemistry
This course surveys major principles of biochemistry including carbohydrates, amino acids, enzymes, lipids, vitamins and nucleic acids. It also covers metabolic processes; including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and biological control mechanisms, and macro-organisms.  Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I.

Bio. 411            Senior Project
This course is basically an individual study or research project supervised by the staff of the department.  At the beginning of his/her senior year, a student is advised to propose a topic for his/her senior thesis.  The student is then required to prepare and submit duplicate copies of the completed paper in order to graduate.  A senior thesis is approximately 5000 words in length.


CHEMISTRY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Chem. 111                      General Chemistry

This course surveys structure of the atoms and the periodic table: the electron; experiments, proton and neutrons, positive ions and mass spectroscopy, quantum numbers and atomic orbitals, electron configurations and their rules, electronic configuration and the periodic table, the survey of the periodic table and its properties. Acids and bases: the Bronsted-Lowery theory of acids and bases, Lewis acids and bases theory, Arrhenius concept of acids and bases, neutralization. The gaseous state and kinetic-molecular theory: gas pressure and gas laws. Study of the chemical kinetics: the overview of the rate of reaction, effects of temperature, concentration, surface area, catalyst. The survey of non-metals including; groups (VA, VIA, and VIIA).

    

Chem. 211            Chemistry I

This course also surveys the basic principles of chemistry, atomic weights, equivalent weights, formula weights, mole concept.  Emphasis will be on the quantitative problems solved in connection with these principles.  Chemical bonding and the necessary quantum mechanics background, together with a study of the principles inherent in the Periodic Table are examined.  Solutions, solution reactions, chemical kinematics and chemical equilibrium in aqueous solutions are studied.  The chemistry of the elements of the first period and that of the non-transition groups (I-VII) are surveyed.  Selected experiments are assigned to introduce the student to the laboratory techniques, methods, and disciplines as needed.  

Chem. 212                     Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory

This is a laboratory course designed to provide students to familiarize laboratory safety rules. study the most important laboratory techniques such as; cleaning glassware, using Bunsen burner, handling chemicals, disposing of chemicals, preparing solutions, handling small volumes, collecting gases, transferring solids, transferring liquids and solutions, preparing filter paper to filter funnel, flushing a precipitate from the beaker, centrifugation, venting gases, heating liquids and solutions, preparing hot water bath or hot plate, heating solids, cooling hot chemicals, using a crucible, testing for acidity/basicity, pippetting a liquid, testing for odor, titration a solution,  mass measurement, volume measurements. Selected experiments which are necessary for secondary school chemistry syllabus assigned.

Chem. 221            Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry I, leading to an elaborate study of chemical bonding, Electrochemistry and thermochemistry are introduced in some detail.  The chemistry groups I, II, V, VI, VII are explored on the basis of the theoretical background learned in Chemistry I.  The first series of the transition elements is dealt with in some detail.  Other transition series are explored in connection with and in comparison to the first series.  The Lanthanides and Actinides are surveyed.  Nuclear structure and radioactivity are introduced.  Selected experiments are assigned.  Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

Chem. 222            Organic Chemistry I

This course provides a systematic account of organic compounds starting with saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons.  Organic reactions are explained on the basis of electronic properties of organic compounds and using these properties, students are encouraged to predict the mechanism of some organic reactions.  This is followed by the study of the physical and chemical properties, methods of preparation and chemical reactions.  Some reference is made to their usefulness and application in organic halogen compounds, alcohols, phenols, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, nitrites, acid, esters, amines, amides, and others.  Selected equipments will be assigned to students to prepare some organic compounds, isolate them, purify them, and investigate their properties.  Prerequisite: Chemistry I.

    
Chem. 311        Qualitative Inorganic Analysis

This is a laboratory course designed to provide students with actual experience in qualitative chemical analysis.  Preliminary to the laboratory work, students will be provided the theoretical background of solutions, the nature of solutions, chemical equilibrium, ionic reaction, removal of ions by distillation, formation of weakly ionized substances, precipitation, the relation between solubility and solubility products.  Common ion effect is also discussed.  The practical part of the course encompasses the separation of the common basic constituents (cation groups I, II, III, IV, V).  The course covers the analysis of the acidic constituents (anions), simultaneous analysis of cations and anions present in solution as well as the systematic separation and identification of mixtures of cations in a solution.  Prerequisite: Chemistry I & II


Chem. 312            Organic Chemistry II
This course is continuation of Organic Chemistry I.  In this course the reaction mechanism of the groups will be emphasized.  Further studies are made on acids, amines, diazonium, salts, etc.  Carbohydrates, polynuclear compounds, amino acids and proteins are also studied.  As well, some other organic compounds of biological significance will be discussed.  Organic Chemistry I.


Chem. 313            Physical Chemistry I

This course covers a study of properties of gas in connection with kinetic molecular theory, atomic and molecular structures.  As well, energies under the principles of wave mechanics are discussed.  Law of thermodynamics and their applications in chemistry are surveyed.  Thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria and electrochemistry are given quantitative and qualitative treatment.  Experimental studies of molecular structures are examined in depth.  Prerequisite: Chemistry I & II.


Chem. 321                    Analytical Chemistry
This course consist primarily theory. It covers the main basic principles of analytical chemistry including; Measurements: scientific measurement and units of measurements. Development of an analytical method: the analytical problem, choosing an analytical method, types of analytical methods. Preliminary operations in quantitative analysis. Choosing analytical methods of analysis including; Gravimetric method of analysis, volumetric method of analysis.


Chem. 322            Physical Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Physical Chemistry I.  It includes elaboration of chemical equilibria and introduction of rates of mechanism of chemical reactions.  Thermodynamics of solutions (electrolytes and non-electrolytes) and colligative properties of solutions are discussed in some depth and given both qualitative and quantitative treatment.  Electrochemistry is given quantitative and qualitative treatment.  
This course covers a study of properties of gas in connection with kinetic molecular theory, atomic and molecular structures.  As well, energies under the principles of wave mechanics are discussed.  Law of thermodynamics and their applications in chemistry are surveyed.  Thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria and electrochemistry are given quantitative and qualitative treatment.  Experimental studies of molecular structures are examined in depth.  Prerequisite: Chemistry I, Chemistry II, Physical Chemistry I.  

Bio. 423            Biochemistry
This course surveys major principles of biochemistry including carbohydrates, amino acids, enzymes, lipids, vitamins and nucleic acids. It also covers metabolic processes; including glycolysis, citric acid cycle, electron transport chain, and biological control mechanisms, and macro-organisms.  Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I.

Chem. 411                 Senior Project
This material development is a course.  Students are expected to select a topic of their own choosing and the approval of the faculty.  Students are to develop materials that may be used to teach Chemistry more effectively in the secondary school.

Chem. 412                    Environmental Chemistry
This course surveys the environmental pollution and pollutants in air, water and soil. Atmospheric pollution and photochemistry of oxides of nitrogen and sulphur. Acid rain, its origin and environmental impacts. Atmospheric concentrations of fluorocarbons and oxides of carbon. Greenhouse effect. Natural and potential toxicity of particulate and gaseous emissions resulting from the combustion of petroleum based fuels, including petrol, diesel and gasohol. Lead fuel additives and potential health hazards. Recent developments in emission, advances in combustion technology. Environmental pollution associated with agriculture and industry. Contamination of water, air and soil, and living organisms by organic chemicals (biocides, detergents and petroleum), heavy metals (lead, cadmium, and mercury) and inorganic ions (nitrite, fluoride and phosphate).                  

Chem. 413                   Qualitative Organic Analysis
 Part A: This is a laboratory course normally reinforced with a minimum number of lectures. It provides a systematic study of analysis and identification of organic compounds. The course covers a comprehensive set of (a) preliminary tests for a compound, (b) classification tests, identification tests, and (c) some spectroscopic analysis supporting the analysis. The course is designed to provide students with actual experience of analysing compounds and it covers a minimum of six unknowns.
Part B: The second part of this course elaborates separation of mixtures, identifications, paper chromatography, identification of amino acids in fruits, and thin-layer chromatography. As well, identification of coloured substances is covered. Prerequisite: Qualitative Inorganic Analysis & Organic Chemistry I & II.               

Chem. 421                 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
This course provides comprehensive coverage of the field of inorganic chemistry.  The course subject matter is divided into three parts.  Part I is primarily concerned with general theory and constitutes the major portion of the course.  Physical, theoretical and structural aspects are discussed.  This first part includes the wave mechanical model of the atom, the nature of ionic substances, the nature of chemical bonding, coordination chemistry studies in terms of V.B. theory and M.O. theory, with some reaction mechanisms.  Part II deals with the chemistry of the transition of metals; as well , the general characteristics, magnetic and optical properties of transition elements and the compounds are discussed.  Part III is the descriptive and comparative study of the non-transitive elements.  Prerequisite: Physical Chemistry I& II, Calculus IV & Linear Algebra.

Chem. 422                    Integration of ICT into Chemistry

MATHEMATICS COURSE DESCRIPTION
Math 111:                 Pre-Calculus
Topic include: Prepositional logic, equations and inequalities, graphs and functions, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithms functions.

Math 121:                 Pre-calculus I
Topic Include: Trignometric functions, identities and conditional equations, matrices and determinants and vectors

Math 122:                 Calculus I
Topics Include: Rate of change of a function (Coordinate, slope of a line, equations of a line, graphs, tangent line, slope of curves, velocity and other rates of change) limits (concept of limits, definition, theorems, infinity as a limit and continuity) derivative of algebraic functions (polynomial, product, powers, quotients, implicit differentiation, fraction powers, linear approximations and differentiation, chain rule and derivative of trigonometric functions). Applications of derivative (Curve sketching, concavity, increasing and decreasing functions, point inflection, asymplates, symmetry, maxima and minima problems related rate of change, the value theorem, interminate forms and L’ Hopital)

Math 221:                 Calculus II   
Topics Include: Integration (definition of integral, method of substitution, the definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus application (Areas, volumes, length of a curve, projectile motions work ect). Derivation of transcental functions (inverse of trigonometric functions, derivative of trigonometric functions and related integrals, derivative of natural logarithms and its properties, derivative of exponential and application exponential and logarithmic) and derivative of hyperbolic functions.

Math 212: Set Theory
Topics include: set and their properties relations and functions, finite and infinite sets


Math 223:                 Number Theory
Topics include: number system (natural, rational and complex numbers) the divisors of number (division Algorithms, great common divisors). Congruence, diaphantine equation, simple and finite continued fractions, generalization.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                

Math 221:                 Calculus III
Topics include: methods of integration, plane analytic geometry, polar coordinate vector and parametric equations.

Math 213:                 Probability and Statistics
Topics include: concept of raw and grouped data, measures of central tendency, variability, linear regression and correlation, axiomatic definition of probability, dependent and independent events, expectation and variance and normal distributions.


Math 222:                 Geometry I
Topics include: Congruent and inequalities of triangles, parallels, polygons, similarity, right triangles and theorems concerning area, volume and surface area of shapes, parametric andnon parametric equations of lines and plances, second degree curves a survey on second degree surfaces.

Math 312:                 Calculus IV
Topics include: Partial differentiation, multiple integral, infinite series, complex functions and variables.

Math 224:                 Linear Algebra
Topics include: vector spaces, homomorphism and isomorphism of vector spaces, linear transformation, algebra of matrices, system of linear equations.

Math 311:                 Differential Equations I
Topics include: Definitions and examples of ordinary differential equations and the elimination of arbitrary constant, equation of order one differential operations with properties auxiliary equations.

Math 321:                 Abstract Algebra
Topics include: Mathematical system different characteristics of groups, Ring’s theory, group theory, field extension and Galci’s theory.

Math 411:                 Senior Project
The student is expected to write a senior thesis dealing with issues concerning the primary and secondary school syllabi.

Math 413:                 Geometry II
Topics include: the axiomatic development of Euclidean geometry, a Sury of Euclidean and non Euclidean geometry.

Math 322:                 Differential Equations II
Topics include: the laplace transform inverse Laplace transformes, partial differential equations, Fourier series with applications.

Math 422:                 Real Analysis
Topics include: Real number system (upper bound and least upper bound) sequences, limit and continuity, differentiability, Reemann integral

Math 421:                 Logic
Topics include: basic ideas and methods, truth functional molecules, natural deduction for propositional arguments, natural deduction for quantificational argument

Math 423:             History and Philosophy of Mathematics
Math 412            Integration of ICT to Mathematics
PHYSICS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Phy. 211            Introduction to Physics I
This introduction to classical mechanics includes units on kinematics and dynamics of particles, work, energy and power, momentum, rotational motion, static, elastic properties of matter, wave motion, sound and fluid mechanics.

Phy. 223            Geometrical Optics
This course is an introduction to optics. Topics include geometrical optics, reflection, refraction, Fermat'’ principle, mirrors, thin and thick lenses, combination of lenses, apertures, fibre optics, prisms and dispersion, aberration, optical instruments, interference and polarization.

Phy. 311            Thermodynamics
This course provides a detailed treatment of the principles of thermodynamics. Topics include the quations of state, the first law of thermodynamics, work and heat, heat capacities of gases, change of phase, heat engines and the second law of thermodynamics, entropy, physics of low temperature, probability and definition of temperature.

Phy. 212            Mechanics I
This course provides a detailed survey of mechanics. Topics include particle and rigid body mechanics, Newton’s Laws, static of a system of particles and a rigid body, kinematics of rigid bodies and their relative motion, dynamics of particles and vibrating systems, moment of inertia, and dynamics of rigid bodies.  Prerequisite: Physics I and II, Math 200.


Phy. 312            Gen Experimental Physics
This course surveys experimental methods in physics. Topics include principles of measurement, graphs, error estimates, making reports, experiments at the secondary school level (how to prepare, plan and carry out), and experimental work in connection with teaching Physics. At least fifteen such experiments will be conducted.

Phy. 321            Atomic Physics
This course surveys solid state physics. Topics include atoms in crystals, waves in crystals, defects and disorder in crystals, dislocation in crystals, the thermal vibration of crystal lattices, photons in non-metals, thermal conductivity, free electrons in crystals, electrical conductivity and band theory, semiconductors, p-n junction, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism, anti-ferromagnetism, dielectric properties.


Phy. 313            Physical Optics
This course provides a detailed treatment of the principles of optics. Topics include polarization of light, relativistic optics, vectorial nature of light, linear, circular and elliptical polarization, coherence and interference, intensity, diffraction, Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction and optics of a solid.
Phy. 223            Mechanics II
This course is a continuation of Physics 200, Intermediate Mechanics I.

Phy. 324            Electromagnetism
This course provides a detailed treatment of electricity and magnetism. Topics include electrostatic fields, Coulomb’s Law, electric dipole, linear electric quadripole, potential energy of charge distribution, energy density, electric polarization, electric susceptibility, LaPlace’s and Poisson’s Equations, magnetic fields, magnetic induction, the Biot-Savart Law, movement in a magnetic field, Ampere’s Circuital Law, Faraday’s Induction Law, self induction, magnetic torque, magnetic susceptibility, Maxwell’s equations, propagation of electromagnetic waves, place waves in infinite media, reflection and refraction, and guided waves.

Phy. 412            Quantum Mechanics
Topics include fundamentals of quantum mechanics (classical theory and experiments, deBroglie Theory, Schrodinger’s Equation, concept of an operator, physical interpretation of a wave function, electron diffraction, postulates of quantum mechanics, average values of functions and operators, uncertainty principles), values of energy operator (definition, boundary conditions, potential trap, parity, normalization, in continuum, Dirac function, linear harmonic oscillator, Hermite polynomials, probability of finding a particle), orbital, ozimuthal and magnetic quantum numbers, two particle systems, principal quantum number, degeneracy, elementary perturbation theory, spin (magenton, experimental facts proving existence of spin, Pauli equation), Dirac theory of the electron.

Phy. 422            Introduction to Astronomy
                See department for course description.

Phy. 323            Solid State Physics
                See department for course description.


Phy. 411            Senior Project
Each student is assigned a project that is related to the problems of teaching Physics in the secondary schools.  Alternatively, students may prepare a comprehensive report on a specific problem in a government institution or a factory (the problem should be related to Physics).

Phy. 413            Electronics I
This is a survey of electronics. Topics include R-L-C circuits, resonance, vacuum tubes (thermionic emission, the diode, the triode, amplification, multi-electrode tubes), crystal diodes, transistors, amplification and power supplies, amplifiers (power amplifiers, basic modulation and demodulation), basic diode detectors, automatic volume control applications (receiver principles, transmission lines and antennae, transducers).

Phy. 413            Nuclear Physics
This course surveys the Physics of the atomic nucleus. Topics include the Thomsen atom, Rutherford’s theory of the scattering of alpha particles, characteristics of the nucleus of the atom, the constitution of the nucleus, proton-electron hypothesis, nuclear transmutation and the discovery of the neutron, the proton-neutron hypothesis, magnetic and electric properties of the nucleus laws of radioactive transformation (radioactive disintegration, the disintegration constant, half-life and the mean life), radioactive equilibrium, the natural radioactive series, units of radioactivity.

GEOGRAPHY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Geo. 111            World Regional Geography
This course provides a geographic survey of four major regions of the Earth; the Near East, Asia, the Americas, and Europe. Topics include: natural settings; natural resources; population distribution; important occupations; and, the problems of future development.

Geo. 211            Physical Geography
This is an introductory course that surveys the content and objectives of geography. Included are some investigation of the tools which geographers use and examination of physical elements of the Earth such as landform, soils, the Earth’s crust and its relief form, rocks and minerals, Earth movements and geological structure, wasting of slopes and the cycle of landmass denudation, folds, faulting systems, crystalline masses and volcanic forms.

Geo. 223            Weather and Climate I
This is a course dealing with the basic forces, patterns and processes that create weather in various world regions. Basic topics that will be discussed are: major climatic elements, the controls that act upon them, their complex distribution over the globe and the resultant climatic types; the mechanics of the  atmosphere and its layers and circulations; radiation and the global heating process; clouds and precipitation; atmospheric masses and the resultant weather variations; and, minor techniques in weather forecasting.

Geo 312             Weather and Climate II
Climate and natural vegetation; climate and soil, climatic influences on geomorphic processes; geometric processes in different climates, secondary atmospheric circulation.

Geo. 413            Geography of Africa
This is a survey course organized around a regional treatment of the globe.  Topics included are land, population, climate, vegetation, natural resources, transportation, cultural and ethnic background, technologies, health and diet, economies, political divisions and development problems.

Geo. 221            Population and Culture
This course surveys the historical evolution of the human-land relationships. Topics include the early migrations, cultural changes and population growth, present and future population distribution, the physical environmental, transportation, land use, technologies and growth of urban areas.

Geo. 321            Political Geography
This course traces the development of various political units of the world. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding and analyzing the process by which the modern state develops in relation to other social institutions.

Geo. 211/322        Cartography I and II
This course is designed to cover two separate semesters. Students will study map making techniques including such topics as: scales; projections; cartographic designs; photogrametry;classification of maps according to their utility; directions and bearings of one place to another; position on a map; representation of physical features; contours; profile drawing; slopes and visibility; representation of topographical maps; weather maps; conventional symbols (cloud, wind, visibility, pressure and temperature); and, representation of statistical data (histogram, frequency curve, multiple dots, density maps).


Geo. 311            Economic Geography
This course focuses on the problems of developing nations.  Planning is the central theme that is studied in relation to manpower, education, natural and human resources, health, politics, functional relationships between geographic features and man’s economic needs and activities (production, consumption and exchange of goods and services).  Development principles are applied to Somalia and the unique problems of development in Somalia are examined.

Geo. 323            Quantitative Analysis
This is an introduction to quantitative analytical methodology. Topics examined include: the Earth as a spherical body in terms of parallels and meridians; projections and their uses; organization and interpretation of data; nature of variables; levels of measurements; standard deviation.  Some practical work will be included.

Geo 422             Biogeography


Geo 423             Environmental Education

Geo. 411            Management & Conservation of the Environment
This course examines how human interaction with the environment generates fundamental changes in the structure and function of the ecosystems.  It consists of a balanced coverage of major ecological concepts, problems and possible solutions with special attention to the African continent.

Geo. 412            Rural Development & Community Planning
This course is an introduction to basic principles of rural development. The course examines rural economic problems and theoretical frameworks for analyzing these problems. Different approaches and strategies to reduce the gap between urban and rural development in terms of distribution of employment, health, education, and increased standard of living programs are discussed.

Geo. 421            Senior Project
This course requires independent research work under the supervision of members of the department. The courses begins during the seventh semester of a student’s program of study and ends with the eight semester. It consists of writing a thesis on an approved subject of the student’s choosing. Local research should be emphasized.

HISTORY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
Hist. 211              Ancient History
This course explores the history of humans from the family of communes of hunters, fishermen, cattle breeders and farmers to the rise of selected ancient civilizations. For comparative purposes the civilizations of Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and China will be surveyed to pave the way for a more detailed study of ancient Greece and Rome. The course outlines the origins of the Roman Empire and the rise of Christianity up until the fall of the Eastern Roman Empire. An outline history of the Medieval period up to 1500 A. D. will be presented.

Hist. 212              African History I
This course examines the emergence of African man. Topics include: Early attempts to control the environment, the independent change from hunting and cattle breeding to the development of agriculture and the use of iron, and the development of trade and the growth of cities and states. Early kingdoms of Egypt, Kush, and Axum are surveyed. The development of the Trans-Saharan Trade in west Africa and the establishment of urban centers such as the medieval empires of Ghana, Mali, Songhai, Kanem-Borno, and the forest states are examined. This course also traces the arrival of Portugal along the coasts of Africa as well as the impact of its rule in East African city-states.

Hist. 221              World History I Since 1500 to 1800
This course is survey of the main events that shaped world history between 1500 and 1800, such as the great European transformation from feudalism to capitalism, from the end of the Middle Ages to the enlightenment. Emphasis will be placed on economic expansion, intellectual changes, development of modern states and European nationalism and imperialism. Simultaneously, the impact of expansion into Africa, Asia, and the Pacific and resulting resistance by the Muslim peoples and the peoples of the Far East(India, China, Korea, Japan) will be examined. The course also surveys developments in Africa, America, and Australia during the period of Western expansion.

Hist. 311              African History II
This course provides an introduction to the historical background of East and Central Africa. Topics include: early relations with Mediterranean, Near East, and Far East civilizations; the role of trade; the development of coastal trade cities along the Indian Ocean; and the emergence of kingdoms, the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade and its impact on the peoples of Africa politically, economically, socially, and demographically. This course also explores the European scramble and partition of Africa, colonial administrations, nationalism movements towards decolonization.

Hist.  322             World History II Since  1800
This course spans the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century. Topics covered include: the emergence of monopoly capitalism and Western imperialism in the nineteenth century leading up to the Frist World War; the impact of  these events on other parts of the world including the colonial scramble and the partition of Africa; the emergence of the United States as a capitalist power in the between the First and the Second World Wars; the Bolshevik Revolution in Russia; and the rise of Nazism, Fascism, and Japanese imperialism culminating in the Second World War.

Hist. 323                  Near East  I
This course outlines the rise of Islam. For introductory purposes, the course begins with the Arab history before Islam. Topics discussed in-depth include: the life and teaching of the Prophet Mohammed; the early Islamic states and the establishment and organization of the Ummayad Empire; the classical age of the Abbasid Caliphate; and, the contributions of the Islamic culture to the Medieval European thought. The Osman Empire is briefly introduced.


Hist. 224                History of the Contemporary World
This course surveys the rise of nationalism in Africa, Asia, and Latin America; the struggle between capitalism and socialism in the Cold War; and the impact  of the military rivalry between the NATO and Warsaw pacts on conflicts around the world, e.g., the Korean War, Vietnam, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and Afghanistan, USSR under Gorbachev and the end of Communist rule, emergence of  U. S. A. solely as a single super power, formation of a European Union.

Hist. 223            Somali History I
This course attempts to identify the peoples of the Horn of Africa in general, and the Somalis in particular, and study their cultural, socio-economic, and ethnic relationships. Emphasis is placed on the study of Somalia within the historical context at the end of the Second World War. Topics covered include: early relations with the Mediterranean, Near East, and Far East civilizations; the coming of  Islam and its political and cultural impacts, the process of colonial scramble such as explorations, treaties, partition, establishment of colonial administrations, and the Dervish national resistance.

Hist. 412            Introduction to Archaeology
An introduction to the basic methodology required in using archaeological research for historical analysis is presented. If time permits, the basic methodology in using oral tradition for the construction of African history in general and Somali history in particular will be studied.

Hist. 413            History of U. S. A.
This course begins with the origins of the United States in early flights from religious persecution in Europe. Topics covered include: difference between northern and southern settlements and economies along the Atlantic coast during the colonial period; the independence movement and the revolution; the frontier in the American character; the causes of the Civil War; Reconstruction; the of industrialism and corporate America; American imperialism; the First and Second World Wars; and, the Great Depression. The course concludes with an examination of American influence over the rest of the world up to the present.

Hist. 423                  Contemporary African History
This course is a survey of African history since the end of the Second World War. It traces the origins of African nationalism, Pan-Africanism, the struggles for independence, the emergence of national states, the formation of the O. A. U., post-independence problems, and, the formation of African Unity.

Hist. 424                  Anthropology
This course is general description of anthropology, discovery of the past and human evolution (Biological and cultural). It includes topics on modern humans, cultural variation in societies. At last, the course concludes the application and practices of anthropology.
 
Hist. 411/421                  Senior Project
This independent research work under the supervision of members of the History Department begins during the last semester and consists of writing a thesis on an approved topic of the student’s own choosing. The thesis may consist of research into fresh source material or reinterpretation of familiar materials, or some combination of the two. The department may approve the translation of important works into Somali in lieu of the thesis.

Hist. 425                  History of Latin America
This course is an analysis of Latin American development from European, African and Indian origins, emphasizing the formation Colonial Society and culture in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth centuries. Other topics include the background of the anti-colonial movements in the early Nineteenth Century, formal independence and growth of neo-Colonialism.


Hist. 324                  Somali History II
This course surveys the modern history of the Somali people. The time period covered spans right from nationalism movement to the present day.  Topics to be covered include: nationalism movement, independence, and problems after independence, military rule, the collapse of the Republic of Somalia and its aftermath.

 


COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR ENGLISH

ENG 211:            Listening Skills
The course is intended to equip students with basic listening skills. It enables students to integratively use different listening sub-skills in order comprehend information from the spoken discourse. It deals with underlying skills employed to develop better listening skills and, thus, helps students identify purposeful listening from the casual hearing. The course provides students with diversified strategies that needs to be employed to develop the skill and could create good opportunity for students to be better listeners in any language. The course, indeed, does have paramount importance to develop other related skills as selectiveness and note- taking abilities, and academically useful for better accomplishment.

ENG 221:             Spoken English I

This course enables students to develop their ability to express themselves fluently and with a reasonable level of accuracy and appropriacy. It dwells on the aspects of spoken English that are most likely to cause communication problems in interactions with native speakers and speakers of foreign language. It also focuses on the following functions: Introducing oneself and others; Greetings and Partings; Describing people, Expressing Likes and Dislikes (Expressing Preferences), Making Invitations (Formal and Informal), Making Conversations and Expressing Opinions (agreeing and disagreeing). Students listen to a variety of model dialogues and productions-Spoken discourse. This entails accuracy focused dialogue completion exercises and pronunciation works .It also includes directed listening to taped conversations and role-plays in controlled, semi-controlled and free situations.

ENG 223:                 Critical Reading
In this course, students will be expected to read and comprehend a text critically. They will analyze it in terms of the author’s main argument, sufficiency of the evidence provided to support this argument, tone and style employed by the author in the text, the overall plausibility of the subject matter, etc. Furthermore, students read critically and see how an author organizes the presentation of his ideas to actually reflect his way of thinking, accompany their reading with careful analysis and rigorous logical way of reasoning.

ENG 313:                                    Spoken English II  
This course aims at improving the standards of students speaking skills as a continuation of Spoken English I. This course provides intensive speaking skills practice for students to improve the clarity of their English speech.  The primary focus of the course is improvement in the areas that are most important in making speech more understandable and native–like: the concepts of Standard English, Received Pronunciation, and the rhythm of the English speech.  In addition, there will be focus on different registers, speaking for different occasions, participating in debates public speeches, and, strategies for practicing and improving your pronunciation. It also covers functions such as: oral questioning or interview (Job Interview), giving instructions, and telling stories or narrating; presenting oral reports.


ENG 222:              Communicative Grammar
Grammar is the system of principles and rules that allow us to organize our words and sentences into coherent, meaningful language. The course aims to equip students with basic knowledge of English grammar. It intends to help them see how the language works and internalize the grammatical forms in order to use them for the purpose of expressing meaning. With significant departure from traditional analysis of grammatical forms, the course assumes focus on functions by way of contextualizing each structure to help students get themselves in a position to use English structures for communication purposes. To this end, the course will review and reinforce: sentence elements, parts of speech; tenses, basic agreement rules, phrases, clauses, voice, conjunctions, tag questions, conditionals,  gerunds,  articles,  punctuation, capitalization, and other grammatical needs of students.

ENG 312:             Business Communication
The concept of business writing; various types of business letters; inquiry/request letters, order letters , credit and collection letters; sales letters; claim/complain letters; social-business letters such as letters of congratulations, thank you letters, letters of condolence, invitation letters;  employment related communications: drafting job vacancies, job descriptions ,job applications, CV/resume,  job offer letter , resignation letter;  conducting job interviews; writing memos, email and fax messages. Drafting notices, minutes, conducting meetings, chairing and participating in meetings; business report writing conventions; Drafting business project proposals; Designing and delivering business speech,

ENG 321:             English Phonetics & Phonology
This course is in an introduction to the sounds of the English language. In this course we will look at the way speech sounds are produced and the way these sounds are organized in English into distinctively different segments of sound, and suprasegmental sound patterns. To deal with articulatory phonetics, we will look at the organs of speech, speech production processes, and provide and introduction to the phonetic transcription of speech and the International Phonetic Alphabet. In dealing with segmental phonology we will introduce the basic concepts of segmental phonology. These include phonemes, allophones, distinctive features, contrastive, complementary, parallel and defective distribution, phonotactics and allophonic rules. We will also introduce a number of the more common allophones and allophonic processes in English. Then we will look at the syllable and how syllables are structured, stress patterning, rhythm, tone and intonation.


ENG 322:             Advanced Writing Skills
This is a course designed to help students develop their writing skills. In the course, students will be exposed to the skills of organizing ideas, drafting texts, and revising the drafted texts. The texts include coherent paragraphs and essays which can deal with logical arrangement and development of ideas like description, argumentation, and exposition (definition, exemplification, process, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, etc).

ENG 312:             Fundamentals of Literature
As an introduction to the study of literature, the course focuses on making students familiar with and develops their knowledge of the basic concepts and genres of literary works which will help them study other fields of literature. The course helps students develop a different perception and approach to the reading of literary works which in turn enhances their skills of extracting and analyzing meaning out of their reading. Emphasis will be on recognizing the way language and its structure is used in literature to convey message to its audiences.


ENG 323:             Translation & Interpretation  
This course treats the art of translation from the dual perspectives of theory and practice. We shall look at various theoretical issues that impact on the choices translators make and spend much of class time practicing various translation strategies and honing particular techniques. The course also gives emphasis to language and culture as they impinge on the process of translation and familiarizes students with a variety of strategies for dealing with mismatches between source and target languages and cultures. Topics covered include textual and contextual meaning; genres and text types; dialect and register in translation; translating culture-specific references; wordplay, metaphor and puns.

ENG 311:            Introduction to Language and Linguistics  
This course is foundation for all linguistics courses taught in the Department of English. The course offers general introduction to the nature of language and other communication systems, and it is designed to be a broad-based overview of the scientific study of language: linguistics. The topics covered in this course provide students an opportunity to examine the nature of human language and other systems of communication, to study and practice language analysis on the core areas of linguistics: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and writing systems, along with other important areas, such as pragmatics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and language acquisition.

ENG 413:                The Novel
Students are exposed to the readings of various novels and practice on all elements of a novel: On top of that, they get opportunities for learning different vocabularies from the contexts of the novels and they get experience of employing grammar for communication purposes following the authentic models in which the novels have been written.

ENG 412:            English Morphology and Syntax    
This course is a composite course that contains the two core components of the mental grammar: morphology and syntax. The first part of the course introduces students the basic notions of morphology:  word, lexeme, word forms, grammatical word, morph, morpheme, and allomorph. Moreover, the morphology part of this course focuses on identifying types of morphemes, word formation processes such as affixation, conversion, compounding and other types of word formation processes. The syntactic component of the course introduces students to grammatical categories and features, how these categories combine to form larger meaningful units such as phrases, clauses and sentences, based on Transformational Generative Grammar.